AFRICA

(1100 - 1980 C.E.)

1 - Apollo 11 stones
1 - Apollo 11 stones
4 - Running horned woman c2
4 - Running horned woman c2
4 - Running horned woman
4 - Running horned woman
167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe.jpg
167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe.jpg

167. Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe. Southeastern Zimbabwe. Shona peoples. c. 1000–1400 C.E. Coursed granite blocks, 1,780 acres. (an acre is 76% of a football field, with end zones) -Conical tower. Great Zimbabwe Shona, Zimbabwe. c. 1350-1450 C.E. Stone, height of tower 30’. -Circular wall – up to 36’ tall, 825’ long

167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe, walls detail.jpg
167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe, walls detail.jpg

167. Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe. Southeastern Zimbabwe. Shona peoples. c. 1000–1400 C.E. Coursed granite blocks, 1,780 acres. (an acre is 76% of a football field, with end zones) -Circular wall – up to 36’ tall, 825’ long

167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe, another walls detail.jp
167 - Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe, another walls detail.jp

167. Conical tower and circular wall of Great Zimbabwe. Southeastern Zimbabwe. Shona peoples. c. 1000–1400 C.E. Coursed granite blocks, 1,780 acres. (an acre is 76% of a football field, with end zones) -Circular wall – up to 36’ tall, 825’ long

169_-_Wall_plaque,_from_Oba’s_Palace.jpg
169_-_Wall_plaque,_from_Oba’s_Palace.jpg

169. Wall plaque, from Oba’s Palace. Edo peoples, Benin (Nigeria). 16th century C.E. Cast brass, 18 ¾”high. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

169_-_Wall_plaque,_from_Oba’s_Palace,_contextual_photo.jpg
169_-_Wall_plaque,_from_Oba’s_Palace,_contextual_photo.jpg

169. Wall plaque, from Oba’s Palace. Edo peoples, Benin (Nigeria). 16th century C.E. Cast brass, 18 ¾”high. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. -Contextual photograph: Oba of Benin, Oba Akenzua II (1933-1978), full regalia includes several carved ivory plaques worn at his waist. Benin, Nigeria, 1964. (Photographer ?)

170 - Sika dwa kofi (Golden Stool).jpg
170 - Sika dwa kofi (Golden Stool).jpg

170. Sika dwa kofi (Golden Stool). Ashanti peoples (south central Ghana). c. 1700 C.E. Gold over wood and cast-gold attachments, curved seat 18” high, platform 2’ wide, 11 ¾” deep.-

CONTENT: What do you see?

FORM: The details (what you see more exactly). How the artist delivers the content.

CONTEXT: Everything NOT observable.

FUNCTION: The intended purpose of the work.

Assignments:

READINGS: 

SNAPSHOT SHEET: 

 

African Unit Sheet:

APAH 250 Images:

African Unit Sheet:

From earlier Prehistoric Unit:

1.  Apollo 11 stones

4. Running horned woman

Objects used in public rituals:

175. Bundu mask
          -contextual photo

173. Female (Pwo) mask

178. Aka elephant mask
         -contextual photo

174. Portrait mask (Mblo)
          -contextual photo

Objects of Power and Authority:

169. Wall plaque from Oba's palace
           -contextual photo of Oba of Benin

171. Ndop (portrait of King Mishe miShyaang

         maMbul)

180. Veranda post of enthroned king and

         senior wife
170. Sika dwa kofi (Golden stool)
           -contextual photo

Object of Memory:

177. Lukasa (memory board)
         -contextual photo

Objects connecting religious belief:

172. Power figure (Nkisi n'kondi)

179. Reliquary figure (byeri)

176. Ikenga (shrine figure)

Architecture of power and authority:

167. Conical tower and circular wall of      

        Great Zimbabwe

Major Civilizations

  • Nok (500 BCE-200 CE)         Nigeria

  • Great Zimbabwe (11th- 15th c.)    Zimbabwe

  • Ife Culture (11th-12th c.)       Nigeria

  • Aksum (1200-1527)               Ethiopia

  • Benin (13th-19th c.)               Nigeria

  • Mende (19th-20th c.)             Sierra Leone

  • Kongo (19th-20th c.)             Congo


Key Ideas

  • Centered around spirituality, the spirit world, and the role of ancestors is huge to incorporate into artworks

  • Fertility of man and of the land is key

  • Most common materials are wood, ivory, and metal

  • Mostly utilitarian, usually for ceremonies

  • Architecture is predominately mud brick

  • Stone used in Zimbabwe and Ethiopian churches